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On September 25, 2019, searches on merriam-webster.com for the definition of this 3-word Latin term increased by 5,500%

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On September 25, 2019, searches on merriam-webster.com for the definition of this 3-word Latin term increased by 5,500%

We all want to sharpen our focus and improve our brainpower but in order to do so, we need to pay special attention to our daily habits. A very helpful idea can be to solve the clue of the day from Jeopardy! It offers a great way to test our knowledge and our thinking skills on a daily basis. Clue of the day varies from different topics such as art, history, geography, nature, famous people, and many other aspects of life. By solving the clue of the day you will boost your memory and increase your brain power naturally while you test your knowledge and explore new information daily. Develop your curiosity and creativity by solving clues from the most interesting and popular game show.

Before we answer the above clue let us mention once again the contestants for today:

Nibir Sarma, a sophomore at the University of Minnesota from Eden Prairie, Minnesota
Nibir Sarma on Jeopardy!
Natalie Hathcote, a junior at Liberty University from Parker, Colorado
Natalie Hathcote on Jeopardy!
Tyler Combs, a senior at Indiana University from Greenfield, Indiana
Tyler Combs on Jeopardy!
Below you will be able to read few information about the Today Clue Solution:

The Latin phrase quid pro quo originally implied that something had been substituted, as in this instead of that. Early usage by English speakers followed the original Latin meaning, with occurrences in the 1530s where the term referred to substituting one medicine for another, whether unintentionally or fraudulently. By the end of the same century, quid pro quo evolved into a more current use to describe equivalent exchanges.

In 1654, the expression quid pro quo was used to generally refer to something done for personal gain or with the expectation of reciprocity in the text The Reign of King Charles: An History Disposed into Annalls, with a somewhat positive connotation. It refers to the covenant with Christ as something “that prove not a nudum pactum, a naked contract, without quid pro quo.” Believers in Christ have to do their part in return, namely “foresake the devil and all his works”.

Quid pro quo would go on to be used, by English speakers in legal and diplomatic contexts, as an exchange of equally valued goods or services and continues to be today.

The Latin phrase corresponding to the usage of quid pro quo in English is do ut des (Latin for “I give, so that you may give”). Other languages continue to use do ut des for this purpose, while quid pro quo (or its equivalent qui pro quo, as widely used in Italian, French and Spanish) still keeps its original meaning of something being unwillingly mistaken, or erroneously told or understood, instead something else.

(Source: Wikipedia)

Each day you can see the answers of the latest clues on our website or the clues of previous dates. If you get curious to know if you figured out the correct answer or not give it a try and check for the correct response on the website of Clue of the Day. Give yourself a little competition and try out Clue of the day and you will notice amazing benefits.

The answer for: On September 25, 2019, searches on merriam-webster.com for the definition of this 3-word Latin term increased by 5,500% is as following:

POSSIBLE SOLUTION: What is quid pro quo?

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